One of the advantages of attending a workshop run by the editor, Dorothy Cockrell, is that no-one is asked to write it up for the journal. Instead, here is a version of the notes she gave out to the participants.

“Soft enamels melt and flow at lower temperatures than hard ones. Therefore, they have become runnier by the time the harder enamel melts. If the soft enamel is under the hard one, it can bubble up through the hard one and show as spots. This is known as ‘fall through’ (looking at it another way – the hard enamel falls through the softer one). The size and spacing of the spots depend on the size of the grains of enamel, the thickness of the layers and the temperature of the kiln.

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