The Guild of Enamellers is delighted to announce Yasmin Belkhayat as the 2018 winner of their annual Bursary Award. Yasmin recently completed the Diploma in Jewellery and Goldsmithing Skills and Design run by the Crafts Council of Ireland based at Kilkenny Campus, University of Maynooth, Ireland.

 

Yasmin initially started working with enamels as part of the Holts Apprenticeship course where she was introduced to a wide range of techniques. During her Diploma Yasmin further developed her champlevé and cloisonné skills and spent considerable time testing fluxes and enamels before completing her application pieces. The Bursary Award package will allow Yasmin, who is London based, to experiment further with other techniques such as painting and plique-à-jour and to expand her knowledge of fluxes and finishes. Yasmin is passionate about enamelling and wants to incorporate it into her future jewellery and silversmithing projects.

 

The Guild is extremely grateful to joint sponsors The British Society of Enamellers, W G Ball Ltd, craft&design Online, Proops Brothers Ltd, Milton Bridge Ceramic Colours and Vitrum Signum for supporting the Bursary Award.  Thanks to the generosity of our sponsors, Leanne McCormack and Mahroz Hekmati were awarded runner-up prizes.The selection panel was impressed by the quality and diversity of the submissions, and were heartened to see a resurgence in the use of traditional techniques such as cloisonné, plique-à-jour and champlevé among applicants. It was clear that the applicants had a real enthusiasm, passion and flare for enamelling. 

Click below to download a pdf showing the work of all the entrants.

 

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Get your helmets on. And no, they didn't have horns!

This is at the Roskilde museum in Denmark and is the reconstruction of the 30 metre warship, Skuldelev 2, built near Dublin in 1042 by Scandinavian boatbuilders.

W G Ball's are offering a 15% discount to members (except kilns and controllers) on all orders from now up to the conference and taken during the conference, normal carriage will be charged on orders unless collecting from the conference which is free.  

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For any members who haven't had their journal yet, here are details about Conference, the workshops and costs etc.

Processing of applications will begin on 30th December. Places are allocated on a first come first served basis, if a workshop is oversubscribed on day one a ballot will be held. The Conference Secretary is prepared to accept e-mail notification of workshop choice, but to hold the place this must be backed up by a completed application form and payment within 10 days.

PLEASE NOTE: if you are unable to post your application form and need to send it electronically, you will need to download the pdf of the application form, fill it in and save the completed form as a separate pdf. This completed form will then need to be emailed to Jane Sheppard as an email attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

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Workshop Report – Casting for beginners            Glenbuchat Group  March 2016     

Laura Selway invited me to do a casting workshop at the Aberdeenshire Group that meets regularly in Glenbuchat. Do get in touch with Laura if you want to go along. I was pleased to have been invited because casting is ‘my thing’, because I’m impressed by the activities of this group and to try out the casting workshop that I’ll be offering in the Algarve this November http://www.endlesssummersurfretreat.com/events-groups/julia-cowei/ 

Fig 1: Cuttlefish mould ready to pour

In the morning we tried out cuttle fish casting, a slightly hit and miss affair, but lovely when it works. Cuttlefish are available from www.cooksongold.comor your local pet shop. If you collect them from a beach do make sure that they are dry before you pour in molten metal.

 

Fig 2: Cuttlefish mould poured with silver (hence the burning)

We used pewter as this melts readily and pours well. Unfortunately it can’t be enameled because it melts at a lower temperature than the enamel. (If you Google you can find ways to paint it to look enameled, which I haven’t tried.) It is a really good practice metal for silver casting, as the technique is the same.

 

Fig3a and 3b: Finished cuttlefish casting

Pewter now is lead free and can be used for any silver-coloured project. Pewter can be bought from www.britishtinandpewtermills.com and melts with a standard d-i-y gas torch.

 

Fig 4a and 4b: pewter castings

In the afternoon we did oil sand casting, which gives finer detail and is more reliable as a method. It has less character if you like more organic pieces, but is good if you want accuracy.

 

Fig 5: Oil sand mould just after metal pour

A kit is available from Cookson Gold or a search on eBay will give you more economic options. I also got the handled crucible from eBay. It is really good for pewter pours.

 

Fig 6: Opening the two-part sand mould

In my work I use a local beach sand and local clay mix that I make up. The sand is re-useable, unlike the cuttlefish moulds, which tend to burn.

 

Fig 7: Pewter bowl cast in beach sand mix

 

Fig 8: Silver bowl cast in beach sand.

 

Julia Cowie 

    fig 1fig 2 fig 3afig 3b   fig 4afig 4bfig 5 fig 6fig 7fig 8